Prose

Writer


Raymond Hardie has had three novels and many articles published. He has  had four stage plays produced and also a number of screenplays bought by BBC Television. For further information  on video and screenplay writing see Script Writer page.

For prose writing see below.

NO MAN’S LAND

Hardie’s current novel, No Man’s Land, is a political thriller, set in Los Angeles, Berlin and Washington D.C., during the spring of 1933. It is published by Endeavour Press, London, and available as an e-book and in paperback.

1933: They tried to poison the election. Then they plotted to remove him from the White House. No Man's Land is based on the "Business Plot" against FDR.
1933: They tried to poison the election. Then they plotted to remove him from the White House. No Man’s Land is based on the “Business Plot” against FDR.

 

 

 

FLEET

WW II, novel, historical fiction
FLEET
The great Chatham dockyards dominated the town and the lives of three families in pre-war WW II England.

Published by Hodder and Stoughton, London, hardback and paperback.

The great naval dockyards of Chatham, England, before the Second World War. With Hitler’s German rearming, and war looming, the activity along the dry docks and inside the machine shops is relentless.   The British are developing Radar, and a German spy is attempting to steal the secrets that will win the war for Britain.

But who is the spy?

 

 

 

Fleet, family saga, pre WWII England
FLEET
In the pre-war years, Chatham is a great seaport where the royal dockyard prospers and lives center on service to the fleet.

Fleet is the story of three families: Kitty Cullen from the slums of Liverpool; Albert Gillings, a senior foreman at the yards; Captain James Hanley RN and his troubled socialite wife; Eddie Brent, flash club owner. All are part of the fateful whirlpool of ambition, love, treachery and political idealism found in the shadow of the yards.

“The submarine finally settled on the seabed at 3:55 in the afternoon. The final jarring shudders had snapped the one flip on the starboard door of the bow compartment. The effort by Gillings and his son, Terry, to secure number-one bulkhead had been in vain. Both of the for’ard compartments were now open to the sea. The lives of over 100 men were about to be forfeited to one act of sabotage.”

 

 

ABYSSOS

Abyssos, occult horror, New York 1908
ABYSSOS
Knowledge is power. Power over life, power over death, power over damnation.

Published by Tor Paperback, New York City.

New York City in 1908. A city of contrasts. Of vast wealth and indescribable poverty. A city of pulled by 20th century science, and dangerous superstitions.

NYPD lieutenant Peter Doolan was assigned the case of the young woman whose dissected body was pulled from the Hudson River. It led him into an underworld of human sacrifice, testing his faith, and presenting imminent danger to his immortal soul. Joining with the Coptic monk, Araya, Doolan confronted the beliefs of an ancient cult that scorned Jehovah and replaced him with the un-nameable godhead in Abyssos.

“The lawyer Pendleton sat like a statue as he listened to the priest Bellarma read from the manuscripts. Bellarma slowly translated, and Pendleton stopped him often. What he heard was difficult to understand, but more than that it was frightening. ‘We are the cult of Abysses. Our enemies call us the cult of the damned. We have been persecuted by the Church of Rome and its leader, the bishop Hippolytus, and driven from the cities of Constantinople and Alexandria. This desert place is our last refuge …'”

 

 

MAGAZINE WRITING

Hardie has published magazine features in Stanford magazine, Triton magazine, Via, US-China Review and Spaceflight among others.

A sampling of features:

Maurizio Seracini is seeking the lost Leonardo DaVinci mural of the Battle of Anghiari, unseen since the 1540s.
Maurizio Seracini is seeking the lost Leonardo DaVinci mural of the Battle of Anghiari, unseen since the 1540s.

DaVinci Decoded

“The security guard at Florence’s Palazzo Vecchio waves Maurizio Seracini through the door of the Salone dei Cinquecento (the Hall of the Five Hundred). Ahead of him, a busload of English tourists shuffle to a halt under the mural on the east wall. It is a hot, humid, late-summer Tuscan day and the Brits are beginning to wilt under the weight of packaged culture.”

 

 

 

Monica Bill Barnes, dancer
The New York Times dance reviewer dubbed Monica Bill Barnes “The downtown darling.”

One Step at a Time

The Village Voice says  Monica Bill Barnes creates “zippy and understated magic.” For the New Yorker she evokes “silent film comedians with coy primping.” She has also been called one of the wittiest young choreographers around, as well as zany and too much fun to miss.

 

 

Rachel Axler, comedy writer
Rachel Axler
OK, grab a coffee, sit down and be funny—for a living.

Sit Down and be Funny

Welcome to Comedy Central’s Emmy Award-winning The Daily Show located in a nondescript red brick building at the corner of Eleventh Avenue on Manhattan’s West side—as Rachel Axler describes it “just one horse stable and a small highway from the Hudson River.

 

 

 

 

Prague Quadrennial, theater design
Every four years, theater designers from around the world gather in Prague.

All the World’s a Stage

It had all the excitement of a rock concert. Swarms of exotically garbed and coifed young theater designers milled around the forecourt of Prague’s historical art-nouveau Industrial (Prumyslovy) Palace, chattering away in a babble of languages

 

 

 

Cecil Lytle, UCSD provost, pianist
Cecil Lytle is a music professor and a celebrated pianist.

Piano Playing Provost

Cecil Lytle is the youngest of 11 children. His father was the janitor of two apartment buildings in Harlem, New York, and the church organist at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Lytle was a music professor at Grinell College in Iowa before joining UCSD’s music department in 1974. He has also been a visiting professor and artist-in-residence at the Darmstadt Music Festival and the Beijing Conservatory of Music. He has played in venues ranging from Jazz Clubs to the Boston Pops and has recorded 19 albums and CDs.

 

Photo: Thad Russell ROAD TRIP: Hellman filmed Two-Lane Blacktop on a coast-to-coast marathon.
Photo: Thad Russell
ROAD TRIP: Hellman filmed Two-Lane Blacktop on a coast-to-coast marathon.

Still Shooting After All These Years

Four of the 17 chapters in Brad Stevens’s Monte Hellman: His Life and Films (McFarland & Co., 2003) are titled “In Between Projects.” It is a quintessentially Hollywood phrase for a man who is quintessentially non-Hollywood, a testimony to the rough-and-tumble life of independent filmmakers. According to Hellman, ’51, he is never in between anything. He is always working, always creating, always Four of the 17 chapters in Brad Stevens’s Monte Hellman: His Life and Films (McFarland & Co., 2003) are titled “In Between Projects.” It is a quintessentially Hollywood phrase for a man who is quintessentially non-Hollywood, a testimony to the rough-and-tumble life of independent filmmakers.

 

The campus was overrun with automobiles and 'backyard junk.' Then Thomas Church came along and dreamed up a peripatetic's paradise
The Stanford campus was overrun with automobiles and ‘backyard junk.’ Then Thomas Church came along and dreamed up a peripatetic’s paradise.

He Changed the Landscape

His hats first drew the eye. Squashed, stiff-brimmed or floppy, they all shared one feature: practicality. Then the high-laced boots, scratched by tree roots, scuffed by rocks, speckled with tar and invariably layered in dust.

If you attended Stanford anytime from the late ’40s to the ’70s, you might have seen Thomas Dolliver Church in one of those trademark hats, sporting an old tan corduroy jacket with shears poking out of the pockets, striding across campus or just standing, looking up at the trees.

 

 

BEYOND HEADLINES: From the Marketplace studios in downtown Los Angeles, Brancaccio tells listeners "how the world works."
BEYOND HEADLINES: From the Marketplace studios in downtown Los Angeles, Brancaccio tells listeners “how the world works.”

Man on the Street

David Brancaccio puts a down-home spin on business.

Voss’s truck stop on old Route 66, near the town of Cuba, Mo., is at the very center of the U.S. census map. Fascinating? David Brancaccio, host and senior editor of public radio’s Marketplace, thinks so. That’s why, for a week last winter, he chose to broadcast his financial news program from the hair salon at Voss’s, right in the middle of Middle America.

“It’s the sort of thing regular listeners have learned to expect from us—keeping Main Street, not Wall Street, at the front and center of our coverage.”

 

ART, NOT ANGER: Gail Gutierrez McDermid displays two of the paintings done by inmates working in the Arts in Corrections program at Folsom Prison.
ART, NOT ANGER: Gail Gutierrez McDermid displays two of the paintings done by inmates working in the Arts in Corrections program at Folsom Prison.

Escape Through Art

A California prison administrator oversees a successful–and controversial–arts program for inmates.

On a half-finished canvas, a gray, weathered boardwalk winds around grass-tufted dunes, then dips down toward the sea. Gail Gutierrez McDermid, a diminutive figure in a wine-red jacket and black skirt, steps up to the painting. It could be an art studio anywhere–a teacher appraising a work, a pupil listening. But this is Solano State Prison. McDermid, ’66, is administrator of California’s Arts in Corrections program, and the artist, Robert Small, is an inmate serving 15 years to life for murder.

Horse trainer, Stanford magazine
A Day at the Races
Last year, Bob Hess won $1.5 million at the track – and he doesn’t even gamble.

A Day at the Races

A young trainer listens to his horses, but he also believes in patience, teamwork and experience.

As one of the most successful young thoroughbred trainers in Southern California, Hess has had 10 stakes winners in the last three years. The 40 horses stabled in his barn at the Santa Anita Racetrack are worth about $2.5 million.

 

 

 

MIX MASTER: David Easton challenges modern building methods with his ecologically friendly mud-walled houses.
MIX MASTER: David Easton challenges modern building methods with his ecologically friendly mud-walled houses.

Stuck on Mud

David Easton is a visionary with his feet firmly planted on the earth. Literally. On a 2-acre site, nestled under steep, wooded hills outside Napa, Calif., Easton is building atwo-story, 2,600-square-foot, French-style farmhouse for himself, his wife, Cynthia Wright, and the two children still living at home.

And he’s building it out of mud.

 

 

 

 

 

Mars has always fascinated to me, ever since listening to Journey into Space on BBC radio when I was a kid. What can I say!
Mars has always fascinated to me, ever since listening to Journey into Space on BBC radio when I was a kid. What can I say!

A study, led by Bruce Lusignan of the Department of Electrlcal Engineer­ ing, Stanford University concludes that the first humans could land on Mars by 2010 and that a permanent base could be set up within four years.

The interplanetary spacecraft will take nine months to reach the Martian orbit. Every spacecraft launch is planned to take advantage of the fact that the optimum time for the journey between Mars and Earth occurs only every 26 months.

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